Cobh (Cork), Ireland

HAL World Cruise

Monday, May 6, 2019

 

Cobh (once known as Queenstown) is a charming port city at the mouth of the River Lee in Cork Harbor.  From here, over 2.5 million immigrants said good-bye to their homeland and left in search of a better life in the United States during the years 1848 to 1950.  Because the harbor is one of the largest and safest anywhere, capable of taking the largest vessels afloat, the great Transatlantic liners used to come in until the 1950s.   Cobh was the final port-of-call for the ill-fated RMS Titanic.   Cobh also was involved in the rescue efforts of the Lusitania when she was sunk by a German submarine off the coast of Kinsale in 1915.  The survivors were brought here and many of the victims are buried here.  Cobh is the gateway to Cork (the second largest city in Ireland), as well as to Waterford (the city of Crystal) and Blarney Castle with the famous Blarney Stone.

Cork originated in the 7th century but came into its own in the 17th century, experiencing its “golden age” by providing butter to the ships plying the North Atlantic.  During this period, the city expanded, the economy flourished, and many grand Italianate residences were built.  Cork’s most famous building is the church tower of Shandon at St. Anne’s Church.  The Butter Museum, the Cork Butter Exchange and the Firkin Crane Center are all part of the “golden age” of butter.  Today, Cork is home to the Beamish and Crawford Brewery, Murphy’s Irish Stout, and major industrial presences such as Pfizer, Apple, Logitech and even Amazon.  Take a look:

 

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We are passing Cobh on our way to Ringaskiddy at Cork. In the past, we have docked in Cobh. It’s a lovely port and the gateway to Cork as well as Blarney Castle. We suspect that ship, visible on the far left, is the reason we are going on by!!!
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Cobh is an interesting town. There is a small Titanic museum at the dock , there are lots of pubs, boutiques, and charming buildings.
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Cobh’s dock is right in town. There’s a Titanic Museum and cafe attached to the terminal. Look closely (just right of center in the photo), the White Star Line Ticket Office still has the ruins of the tender dock used by the Titanic.
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But Cobh is not where we are. We have docked in Ringaskiddy outside Cork. Another commercial port where it is necessary to shuttle into town.
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So shuttle we did. And we passed lots and lots of cows in beautiful green fields along the way.
The Cork City Hall is our shuttle drop off point.
The Cork City Hall is our shuttle drop off point.
We crossed the River Lee and set out to explore Cork.
We crossed the River Lee and set out to explore Cork.
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Our first stop is the Shandon Bells & Tower at St. Anne’s Church. St. Anne’s, built in 1722, is one of the oldest churches still in use.
The bell tower is open to visitors.
The bell tower is open to visitors.

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St. Anne’s is one of a very small number of churches retaining their original 18th century bells.

Visitors are allowed to ring them!!!
Visitors are allowed to ring them!!!
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After all that hard work ringing bells, we stopped at The Linen Weaver Pub (of the Wetherspoon chain) for lunch.
Nicely repurposed building and an extenxive bar and food menu.
Nicely re-purposed building and an extensive bar and food menu.
Well stocked, you get the impression it's very popular!
Well stocked, you get the impression it’s very popular!
Rog ordered a Beamish Irish Stout.
Rog ordered a Beamish Irish Stout.
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Ahhh, the afternoon libation is pretty good–robust and satisfying! Went well with the Irish stew.
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We checked out the shopping. Shopping is both quaint and cosmopolitan. There are several charming pedestrian areas.
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Actually, its a bewildering maze of pedestrian areas! but hey, there’s a Starbucks!!!
The Downtown area seems to have its fair share of modern department stores.
The Downtown area seems to have its fair share of modern department stores.
There are also shoping malls.
There are also shopping malls.
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Following lunch, our next stop is the Butter Museum to learn about this very important product still admired worldwide.
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This is the Butter Market House (now apparently a B&B). Cork butter merchants introduced and enforced a strict system of quality assurance which made Cork butter internationally recognized for quality.
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The Firkin Crane , designed by John Benson and opened in 1855, is a part of Cork’s original butter exchange.
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At the end of the day, our final stop is The Oliver Plunkett Pub. Known for their live music every night, they provide every genre to suit everyone’s tastes!
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They even provide enough beers on tap to suit everyone’s tastes!!! (this is only 1/2 of the taps.
Rog chose a Rockshore Irish Lager.
Rog chose a Rockshore Irish Lager.
Spotted this sgn as we were walking out.  Cute!!!
Spotted this sign as we were walking out. Cute!!!
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Walking back to the shuttle pick-up, we passed the English Market. A marketplace since 1788, it predates most other markets of its kind. Even Barcelona’s Boqueria did not start until 80 years later!!!
And we say good-bye to Cork as we prepare to sail to our final port.
And we say good-bye to Cork as we prepare to sail to our final port.

 

Our next and last port is Bantry, Ireland.

One thought on “Cobh (Cork), Ireland”

  1. I say “yes” to all the great brews you’ve been enjoying Rog. Same for the great wines Sandy and all the great ports you have called upon. An awesome trip. Thanks for sharing!!

    Like

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