Dublin, Ireland Day 2

Liffey 2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Thursday, August 9, 2018

 

On day 2 in Dublin, we simply went out to enjoy the sights, shopping and food.  As we drove past a beach in Dublin, we talked about the start of this city as a Viking “longphort” (a fortification for the protection of the boats.)  Was it on a beach such as this that the first buildings were erected?  Well, no.  The Viking fortification was near Dublin Castle along the Liffey River.   So, with curiosity piqued, we wondered what a Viking marine fortification would look like.  Back we went to the photos we had taken in Alesund, Norway at the Sunnmore Museum as well as those we had just taken at Guinness Lake in Glendalough a few miles outside of Dublin.  After reviewing turf houses and boat-building sheds we concluded the stage sets for the TV series, Vikings, seemed to be right on.  The longboats would easily sail up the Liffey.  And the turf houses would be easy to erect.

Our curiosity satisfied, we turned our attention to modern-day Dublin.  It is a beautiful and vibrant city with lots to see and do; all within easy walking distance.

Let me show you some photos!

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There are beaches in Dublin. Who knew! This one is not where the Vikings had their “longphort” but it is nearby. The longphort was near where Dublin Castle now stands.
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We wondered if turf structures like these at Sunnmore Museum in Alesund, Norway might have been erected at the longphort.
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However, structures like this Viking hut, constructed as a stage set for the TV series, Vikings, could easily have been part of the defensive structures.
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Coud this TV stage set be a reasonable depiction of how the modern city of Dublin began? I’ll have to do some more research!
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But this is how Dublin looks today. This is the O’Connell Bridge and it is centrally located on the Liffey. That’s the Ha’penny Bridge ahead; Temple Bar is off to the left.
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This photo is looking North along O’Connell Street. The median is lined with statues. The first one you see here is of Daniel O’Connell, a political leader of the first half of the 19th century.
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The Spire of Dublin, also on O’Conell St., is sometimes called The Monument of Light Spire.
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The Liffey River looking West towards the Ha’penny Bridge spanning the next crossing.
The Liffey River looking East towards the Customs House.
The Liffey River looking East towards the Customs House.
Looking to the South.
Looking to the South.
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Eason Books is a large Irish bookstore chain. Founded in 1886, Eason & Son now have more than 60 stores throughout Ireland. This is the flagship store on O’Connell St.
I'd forgotten this is a city where college students conduct free tours.
I’d forgotten this is a city where college students conduct free tours.
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The Guinness Brewery is quite a large complex in Southwest Dublin along the Liffey River.
Guinness Factory & Museum
Guinness Factory & Museum
Statue of Sir Benjamin Lee Guinness on the grounds of St. Patrick's.
Statue of Sir Benjamin Lee Guinness on the grounds of St. Patrick’s.
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St. Patrick’s Cathedral has a spectacular choir loft and contains Ireland’s largest and most powerful organ. The stalls are decorated with the insignia of the Knights of St. Patrick.
Marsh's Library at St. Patrick's Cathedral
Marsh’s Library at St. Patrick’s Cathedral
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Christ Church Cathedral was built from 1172 to 1220. It stands on high ground above the Liffey.
Christ Church Cathedral
Christ Church Cathedral
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This is Trinity College. That line you see is waiting to view The Book of Kells in the Old Library.
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Parliament Square Inside Trinity College Gate and the queue for Book of Kells continues!
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The Ha’penny Bridge spanning the Liffey and leading to Merchant’s Arch and the Temple Bar area.
The Merchant's Arch, a gateway to Temple Bar.
The Merchant’s Arch, a gateway to Temple Bar.
THE Temple Bar
THE Temple Bar
Temple Bar signage--so true!
Temple Bar signage–so true!
The Shack Restaurant is next door to the Temple Bar.
The Shack Restaurant is next door to the Temple Bar.
And this is where we enjoyed our end-of-day libation.
And this is where we enjoyed our end-of-day libation.

 

After this, we are on our way to Greenock, Scotland.

Dublin, Ireland Day 1

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

The people we call Vikings came from the area we call Scandinavia.  They were quite similar in culture, but geographically distinct.  The Danes came from the Jutland peninsula and they tended to maraud in Europe and England and along the Mediterranean; the Swedes (also known as Rus) were on the North and East, they sailed the Baltic and traveled to Russia to plunder and loot; and the Norse were from the North and West so they tended to raid the coasts of Ireland, Scotland and settle in the North Atlantic Islands.  No one knows for sure why the Vikings traveled to the ends of the earth. They sailed their longboats to the Arctic, through the Baltic, across the Mediterranean to Constantinople.  They created settlements in Ireland, Scotland and England.  They colonized Iceland, Greenland, and even the New World where they established Vinland in Newfoundland.  But not a single one of them kept a journal or wrote a diary.  There are no letters, no poems, no stories.  These are a people whose history begins as pirates and raiders but in less than three centuries they faded from history as they not only assimilated, but augmented the economy, politics, and religions of every country they came in contact with.

As we visit Dublin, we learn that the Vikings actually created Ireland’s first true town.  Dublin originated as a “longphort”, a fortified enclosure to protect the ships and function as a staging area for raids.  By 840AD, Dublin had become a permanent settlement and was probably a slave-trading center also.

The Vikings had been raiding the coast of Ireland since 795 and had looted the Monastic City in Glendalough twice.  Today, Glendalough and County Wicklow are the settings for the Canadian/Irish TV series, “Vikings”, now in its 5th season.  The series is based on Neil Oliver’s book, Vikings (Weidenfield & Nicolson, 2012).  Neil Oliver is an archaeologist, historian, writer and award-winning broadcaster.

These are the photos from our trip to Glendalough:

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Lough Tay (Guinness Lake) is fed by the Cloghoge River in County Wicklow. This is one of  several filming locations for the TV series “Vikings.”
An entire Viking village has been created here.
An entire Viking village has been created here.
The Vikings are not on location today.
The Vikings are not on location today.
But their sets are visible.
But their sets are visible.
This is NOT a stage set.  This is a ruin of the original Monastery Gate.
This is NOT a stage set. This is a ruin of the original Monastery Gate.
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St. Kevin’s Kitchen (Church), 12th century. The Bell Tower looks like a chimney.
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This 900AD Round Tower, often confused as a lookout, never was. It was used to call monks to prayer. The door is about 12 feet above the ground and, presumably, was reached via a ladder that could, if needed, be pulled up to prevent an enemy from following.
Today, the Glendalough Hotel welcomes all.
Today, the Glendalough Hotel welcomes all.
There is a very festive atmosphere here.
There is a very festive atmosphere here.
The countryside is boucoic.  This is sheep country.
The countryside is boucoic. This is sheep country.
The hotel sits in a beautiful setting.
The hotel sits in a beautiful setting.
We enjoyed the end of day libation at the Glendalough Hotel.
We enjoyed the end of day libation at the Glendalough Hotel.

 

The next post will show you Dublin proper.

And then we’re off to Greenock, Scotland!

Rotterdam, Netherlands Day 2

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Monday, August 6, 2018

 

I must confess, day 2 in Rotterdam was consumed by all things SS Rotterdam and Holland America Cruise Lines.  We had ended Day 1 coming aboard, checking-in, dinner & drinks, and a little wandering through the public rooms before settling down in the cabin.  We had a comfortable room:  sitting area, desk space, king-size bed, TV with some English language programming, and a really nice curved-glass enclosed shower.  We slept well under feather duvets with the porthole windows open to catch the breeze.  But we did find the mattress to be hard as a board!  This has been a problem that pops up frequently in European hotels.  Could it be we’ve grown old, soft and stiff?

We awoke on day 2 to a bright, warm, sunny day.  After breakfast on the outside Lido deck, we took the Engine Room Tour and then followed it up with the Bridge Tour and Ship’s Tour.  Roger, of course, loved all the mechanical details; I was more interested in the history and design aspects.  It was all fascinating!

And I have pictures:

Model of the SS Rotterdam as she looked in the 1950s.
Model of the SS Rotterdam as she looked in the 1960s.
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This is the type of whimsy you usually find on a Disney ship. It may look real, but this is a scuplture of a crewman painting the hull! The 4 windows above the painter belong to our cabin #6002.
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We booked a catagory of cabin billed as former Officer’s Quarters. This is a view of our cabin, #6002. The middle door of the hutch folds down to form a desk. The chair will do double duty at the desk.
A view of the siing area.
A view of the siing area.
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The sleeping area. I’m certain the officer who had this cabin did NOT have a king sized bed!
The end of day libation in the First Class Ambassador's Lounge.
The end of day libation in the First Class Ambassador’s Lounge.
Dinner in the Lido Restaurant
Dinner in the Lido Restaurant
Look at that photo on the wall.  Doesn't it look like Pat Sajak and Vana White!
Look at that photo on the wall. Doesn’t it look like Pat Sajak and Vana White!
Breakfast on the Lido Restaurant deckside.
Breakfast on the Lido Restaurant deckside.
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This is the promenade deck and that window at the end is the old purser’s office which is now the Ship’s Tour office. It is conveniently located just outside the gift shop!
Starting the engine room tour.
Starting the engine room tour.
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The engine room tour on the SS Rotterdam. All those white pipes are encased because they contain asbestos. Those red stripes are to remind us that care should be taken to not disturb the casing!!!
Starboard Propeller and Spare
Starboard Propeller and Spare
Stabalizer Shaft
Stabalizer Shaft
Engine Room Controls
Engine Room Controls
The engine room crew quarters.
The engine room crew quarters.
Starting the Bridge Tour.
Starting the Bridge Tour.
Fire Control
Fire Control
Communications
Communications
Navigation
Navigation
Bridge
Bridge
Captain's Quarters
Captain’s Quarters
Bridge officer's quarters.
Bridge officer’s quarters.
Foredeck
Foredeck
1000' of Anchor Chain
1000′ of Anchor Chain
All too quickly, the adventure comes to an end and we must depart.
All too quickly, the adventure comes to an end and we must depart.
Back we go on the water taxi.
Back we go on the water taxi.
Back to the New York Hotel Water Taxi Landing.
Back to the New York Hotel Water Taxi Landing.
Back to the MS Rotterdam.
Back to the MS Rotterdam.
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This time, our end of day libation is on the Lido Pool Deck of the MS Rotterdam during our sail away from Rotterdam.
And we wave goodbye to the lovely city of  Rotterdam.
And we wave goodbye to the lovely city of Rotterdam.

 

We are now on our way to Dublin, Ireland

Rotterdam, Netherlands Day 1

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Sunday, August 5, 2018

This is our first visit to Rotterdam.  Long ago, we put “sailing the MS Rotterdam to Rotterdam to stay in the SS Rotterdam” on our bucket-list.  This year:  goal accomplished!  We were delighted with the city itself.  Very modern.  Great architecture.  All the result of necessary rebuilding after the total devastation of German bombing in 1940.

We spent day 1 just acquainting ourselves with the city.  We were delighted to find a FREE Port Authority shuttle outside the terminal.  It took us to the City Center area—near Blaak Station to be precise—where we took photos of quite a few famous local sights.  The Historic Tram #10 departs daily (except Mondays) from Blaak Station every 1/2 hour from 11:00am-4:30pm.  The loop ride through 14 stations takes about 1 hour. You can use this tram as a HOHO!

We shopped the Markthal, had lunch at the Very ITALIAN Restaurant, and hung out at the Hotel New York (former HAL Headquarters in Rotterdam) before taking the water taxi over to the SS Rotterdam for our overnight stay.

I think the photos will tell the story:

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We docked in Rotterdam right alongside the Erasmusbrug. The graceful design of this bridge earned it the nickname “The Swan.”
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The Motorman’s workstation aboard the Historic Tram #10. We boarded the tram at the Blaak Station near Markthal because that is where the free Port Authority shuttle dropped us off. We could have boarded at Willemsplein, a walk across the Erasmusbrug.
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The tickets may be purchased on board the tram. We paid 7 Euro/pp senior rate. It’s a 1 hour loop if you don’t get off. But you can use it as a HOHO and tour all over Rotterdam! There are 14 stops.
A view from Hisoric Tram #10.
A view from Hisoric Tram #10.
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This very busy view shows the entryway to the City Center main shopping area. That statue of Santa Claus is by American artist Paul McCarthy.
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Historic Tram #10 goes as far as Delfshaven where one will find charming cafes and shops.
And a Windmill!
And a Windmill!
The Delfshaven windmill.
The Delfshaven windmill.
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This bronze artwork, “De Verwoeste Stad” (The Devasted City) is the city’s main war monument. Created by Ossip Zadkine, the sculpture represents a human figure without a heart, symbolizing how Rotterdam was cut to the heart by the May 1940 German bombardment.
The "Hoover Building", so called because it reminds you of a vacuum cleaner.
The “Hoover Building”, so called because it reminds you of a vacuum cleaner.
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The Cube Houses. These were built by architect Piet Blom as an unusual bridge over the arterial roadway between Blaak and Oude Haven. #70 is a fully decorated museum house that shows what it’s like to live between slanted walls.
This building is commonly referred to as "The Pencil."
This building is commonly referred to as “The Pencil.”
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“The Pencil” next to the “Hoover” next to the “Cube Houses.” All visible from Blaak station.
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The Markthal, unique for so many reasons! The distinctive horeshoe shape wraps apartments around the Market Hall. Inside, there are stalls, cafes, a supermarket, and even an archeoligical dig! The locals jokingly refer to it as the “Pencil Sharpener!”
The amazing ceiling and walls of Market Hall.
The amazing ceiling and walls of Market Hall, titled “Horn of Plenty”, are the creation of artist Arno Coenen
The Market stalls are enticing!
The Market stalls are enticing!
My favorite shop in the Market Hall!
My favorite shop in the Market Hall!
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Nienke, propietor of “Only for the Sweethearts” shop in the Markthal of Rotterdam.
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I find Coco Chanel to be an intriguing person; so I was drawn to this quote. “Don’t be like the rest of them, Darling!” It’s so very Coco!
A multi-tiered parking garage for bicycles.
A multi-tiered parking garage for bicycles.
Al fresco dining at Very ITALIAN Pizza.
Al fresco dining at Very ITALIAN Pizza.
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The Pizza oven at the restaurant, Very ITALIAN Pizza. We can highly reccommend the Diavola (spicy salami) and V.I.P. (Margherita style) pizzas. Very tasty!
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OLIVES! We love olives and have been feeling olive deprived on this cruise. This should satisfy for a little while.
Today, we had end of day libations with lunch!
Today, we had end of day libations with lunch!
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The Hotel New York, owned by WestCord Hotels, is located in the old Holland America Line headquarters. Renovated in period style, it is conveniently situated across from the Cruise Terminal. The whole building is like a museum of travel!
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Headquarters for the very efficient water taxi system is located next to the Hotel New York. It is available by phone and it never takes more than a few minutes for a cab to arrive! Cost from the hotel to the SS Rotterdam was 4.50 Euro/pp.
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The SS Rotterdam is also owned by WestCord Hotels. It, too, has been renovated in period style–1960s to be exact! We spent the night here (sailed the MS Rotterdam to the city of Rotterdam to stay in the SS Rotterdam!)
Time to go check-in!
Time to go check-in!

 

Next, I’ll tell you about Day2.

Our next port-of-call is Dublin, Ireland.

Eidfjord, Norway

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Friday, August 3, 2018

 

The whole point of going to Eidfjord, Norway is to cruise the Hardanger Fjord!  The scenery is probably spectacular, but we were there on a cold, rainy, overcast day.  We also traversed the fjord very early in the morning and mid-evening for the return to the North Sea so the light for photography wasn’t very good.  Sorry about the dull photos.

The cruise port in Eidfjord is purpose built for tourism.  There is a hotel, information center, super market, and large dock for a single cruise ship along with anchorage for another with a small tender dock conveniently located near everything.  The town welcomes more than 500,000 visitors a year but has only 900 regular inhabitants!  The main attractions are walks along the glaciers within the nearby Hardanger Mountain Plateau National Park, kayaking in the fjord, and the Voringsfossen Waterfall which towers 597 feet.

There is a little “Troll Train” that will take you on a 1-hour tour of the town including the Old Church and Viking gravesites from the Iron Age dating AD400 to 1000 ($11.00/pp outside the Information Center.)

Because the fjord cruising takes several hours itself, the time in town is pretty short (we were only there for 5 hours.)

We did our best to see a lot!

Hardanger Fjord.
Hardanger Fjord.
Hardanger Fjord
Hardanger Fjord
Hardanger Fjord
Hardanger Fjord
Hardanger Fjord
Hardanger Fjord
Anchored in the Hardanger Fjord.  The first tender is going to the dock.
Anchored in the Hardanger Fjord. The first tender is going to the dock.
Anchored in the Hardanger Fjord along with the Aidabelle.
Anchored in the Hardanger Fjord along with the Aidabelle on the dock.
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MS Roterdam anchored in the Hardanger Fjord. At least the tender dock is only a short distance away.
But it is cold and rainy.
But it is cold and rainy.
Quality Hotel is dockside.
Quality Hotel is dockside.
Inside the Quality Hotel, WIFI is available as well as a gift shop.
Inside the Quality Hotel, WIFI is available as well as a gift shop.
The Quality Hotel also has a restaurant and bar.
The Quality Hotel also has a restaurant and bar (my glass of wine was $17.60; Rog’s beer $12.80 for a pint.)  It is expensive visiting the end of the earth!
The Co-op Market is next door to the hotel.
The Co-op Market is next door to the hotel.
Eidfjord
Eidfjord
View of town from the tender dock.
View of town from the tender dock.
Cafe and Turf House
A Cafe and a Turf House
Eidfjord Gamle Kyrkje, 1309
Eidfjord Gamle Kyrkje, 1309
The altar of the Eidfjord Gamle Kyrkje
The altar of the Eidfjord Gamle Kyrkje
Eidfjord town view.
Eidfjord town view.
Another view of the town of Eidfjord.
Another view of the town of Eidfjord.

 

After returning down the fjord to the North Sea, we are, now, on our way to Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Alesund, Norway

2018  HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Thursday, August 2, 2018

 

The city of Alesund is a very special place.  It spans several islands linked by tunnels and bridges and casts a spell on visitors with its distinctive Art Nouveau style of architecture.   The city was chartered in 1848, but it was on a dark and stormy night in 1904 that the entire city center was destroyed by fire.  Over the next three years, the city was rebuilt, almost exclusively in the Art Nouveau style.  Today, Alesund is an important fishing port, centrally located on the Norwegian Sea.

We have been here before and were enchanted by the charm of the architecture.  The history of the area encompasses the Viking Age, but this was an agricultural area and settlements were separated by great distances.  The Sunnmore Museum, just outside of town (9:00am-4:00pm daily, 7.50/pp for seniors) details the lifestyle of the early peoples along with their architecture, industry and community.

One “must do” activity in Alesund is a visit to the Fjellstua Lodge atop Mount Aksla.  You can walk up the 418 steps if you are so inclined, but the little Alesund City Sightseeing train will take you there ($24.00/pp/rt with a stop at Sunnmore, too.)  As will the HOHO for $38.00/pp.  And as will taxis for about 100.00/hour!

Of course, there is nothing wrong in simply walking around the charming town, shopping the quaint shops and enjoying a lunch or libation in a lovely café.  This is a fun, entertaining and interesting port!

Docked in Alesund with a view of Mount Aksla.
Docked in Alesund with a view of Mount Aksla.
The city is, literaly, right across the street from the ship!
The city is, literaly, right across the street from the ship!
All sorts of services are available as one exits to the city center.
All sorts of services are available as one exits to the city center.
Now that looks like some serious fun!
Now that looks like some serious fun!
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The tourist train runs to Sunnmore, up to Aksla view point and into the city center.
There were 4 of us, and this is the option we wound up doing!
There were 4 of us, and this is the option we wound up doing!
The Sunnmare Museum of Viking houses and culture.
The Sunnmare Museum of Viking houses and culture.
Sunnmore Museum
Sunnmore Museum
Turf Houses dominate the displays at Sunnmore.
Turf Houses dominate the displays at Sunnmore.
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The huts on the right are called Kyrkjebuder. They once lined the roads between a church and boathouses on the shore.
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“Church huts” were useful for several reasons: storage for goods due to be shipped, as well as received and awaiting transport to home; or for storage of the hymnals, Sunday clothes, toiletries and other items useful after a long carriage ride to church.
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Boat-building Workshop. Many farms had workshops for building boats. Income was often augmented with fishing and the farmers often built boats for themselves (and others as an additional way to make money.)
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This is a Fjordmannstova. It was built as temprary lodging for those winter fishing forays when shelter was needed but it was too far to return home while the fishing was good. These huts were for the both the crew and equipment.
The boat hall at Sunnmore has several Viking boats.
The boat hall at Sunnmore has several Viking boats.
Even a longboat!
Even a longboat!
Longboats would usually tow a smaller boat behind to carry supplies.
Longboats would usually tow a smaller boat behind to carry supplies.
There are several replicas in the water--but the motors are disconcerting!!!!
There are several replicas in the water–but the motors are disconcerting!!!!
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The Fjellstua Lodge atop Mount Aksla –that zigag path is 418 steps going up! We were glad we had hired the cab!
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View from the top of Aksla with some islands in the distance and our ship (as well as a couple of others!) docked on the left.
View from the top of Aksla.
View from the top of Aksla.
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There is a cafeteria at the top. Both inside and outside seating. The menu appears to be the same in either location.
As is the view.  But it is a bit warmer inside!
As is the view. But it is a bit warmer inside!
The sausage and french fries were quite good.
The sausage and french fries were quite good.
The hamburger was amazing!
The hamburger was amazing!
But the end of day libation remains part of our habit pattern!
But the end of day libation remains part of our habit pattern!
View from the top of some islands and bridges.
View from the top of some islands and bridges.
A map of the tunnels and bridges.
A map of the tunnels and bridges.
The church on the island of Giske built around 1050.
The church on the island of Giske built around 1050.
Giske on the left.
Giske on the left.
Alesund
Alesund
The architecture of Alesund.
The architecture of Alesund.
The oldest house that survived the fire of 1904.
The oldest house that survived the fire of 1904.
Alsund Church
Ålesund Church
And I will close this post with the Viking Laws!
And I will close this post with the Viking Laws!

 

Next, we visit Eidfjord, Norway.

Reykjavik, Iceland

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Sunday & Monday, July 29-30, 2018

 

Established in 874 AD by Norsemen, Reykjavik is believed to be the first permanent settlement in Iceland.  It had a government and parliament by 930 AD.  It remained an agricultural community until 1762 when it was chosen by the King of Norway to participate in the De Nye Indretninger (New Enterprises) project.  These enterprises were meant to modernize the Icelandic economy by means of industrial development and improved craft skills.  Fishing, sulphur mining, agriculture and shipbuilding were undertaken by the Indretninger.  But the wool industry was the primary employer in Reykjavik for decades.  In 1786, when Reykjavik was granted an exclusive trading charter, it was established as a city of importance.  In 1874, Iceland was given a constitution and limited legislative power.  Reykjavik was named the capital.  Home Rule was granted in 1904.  On December 1, 1918, Iceland became a sovereign country under the Crown of Denmark.  Today, Reykjavik is a bustling, busy city.  The tourist trade is booming, and construction is rampant.  Volcanic activity provides Reykjavik with geothermal heating systems for both residential and industrial districts.  By 2008, roughly 90% of all buildings in Iceland were heated with natural hot water.

We have been to Iceland before and spent many days touring in and around Reykjavik.  The Golden Circle Tour (see description in the Corner Brook post) is quite comprehensive, the Blue Lagoon is an experience, and the puffins are just too cute for words!  The local HOHO is very convenient and economical.  But this time, we simply took a cab to the Kolaportid Flea Market on Sunday morning; walked the Old Harbor area; ate lunch at a local pizzeria; and rode to the top of the tower at Hallgrimskirkja for a fabulous view of the entire city.  Then on Monday, we toured the Settlement House (free to all over 65 yrs old!), the oldest house in Reykjavik, and explored more neighborhoods.  We find all of Iceland (but Reykjavik in particular) to be charming and engaging.  We will, most certainly, return again and again.

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The Kolaportid Flea Market. Open Saturdays and Sundays 11:00am-5:00pm. Located in the Old Harbor area.
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It’s a typical flea market with old books, clothes, jewelry, household items, military memorabilia, and STUFF! There’s a food market and a cafe.
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The candy stand has lots of chocolate and marshmallows and nuts. But it is known for its licorice!
Lots of the books are in English.
Lots of the books are in English.
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The famous Icelandic “Lopapeysa.” Made from lamb’s wool, this one costs $169.00. I saw the exact same sweater in a shop on Tryggvagata for $130.00, new! So much for flea market bargains!
These are cheaters--they all have lenses  for the aged and visually impaired!
These are cheaters–they all have lenses for the aged and visually impaired!
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This little hot dog stand is world famous. “Baejarins Beztu Pylsur” sells the BEST hot dogs in town! It’s located just around the corner from the Kolaportid Market.
Everyone enjoys these hot dogs!
Everyone enjoys these hot dogs!
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Ah, now take a look at the line for hot dogs! Enticing even in the middle of a construction zone.
A Reykjavik street view.
A Reykjavik street view.
Aw, aren't they cute!
Aw, aren’t they cute!
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The Harpa (City Concert Hall) is smack dab in the middle of a lot of new construction at the Old Harbor.
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Trains such as this were used in the construction and operation of the Old Harbor.
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The Monument to the Unknown Bureaucrat , 1993, by Magnus Tomasson in front of City Hall
Capital and City Hall on Tjornin Lake
Capital and City Hall on Tjornin Lake
Frikirkjan i Reykjavik Church On Tjornin Lake
Frikirkjan i Reykjavik Church On Tjornin Lake
Frikirkjan i Reykjavik Church
Frikirkjan i Reykjavik Church
The Pearl (Perlan).  An unusual restaurant atop the water towers!
The Pearl (Perlan). An unusual restaurant atop the water towers!
The sculpture "Sun Voyager" on the Reykjavik waterfront.
The sculpture “Sun Voyager” on the Reykjavik waterfront.
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I believe this is the restored building of the King of Denmark’s falconry. I believe those are the original carved falcons on the roof. Today, it houses several different commercial operations.
Lunchtime for us.   Pizza Margherita and Viking beer was just perfect.
Lunchtime for us. Pizza Margherita and Viking beer was just perfect.
In Iceland, they are very progressive.  And they will not give you straws!
In Iceland, they are very progressive. And they will not give you straws!
Hallgrimskirkja and Lief Erickson (Leifur Ericson)
Hallgrimskirkja and Lief Erikson (Leifur Ericson)
The Leif Erikson statue in front of Hallgrimskirkja (Lutheran Parish Church).
The Leif Erikson statue in front of Hallgrimskirkja (Lutheran Parish Church).
Leif Erikson
Leif Erikson
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Lief Erikson sculpture donated to the people of Iceland by the United States of America on the 1000 anniversary of the Althing (Icelandic Parliament) in 1930.
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The Hallgrimskirkja. The church was conducting service when we visited, so we were unable to take photos of the nave or altar.  We did, none-the-less, ride the elevator ($10:00/pp) to the top of the tower for some wonderful views!
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Overlooking the roof of the Hallgrimskirkja. First conceived in 1929, started in 1945, and completed in 1949, it was expanded with this addition in 1974.
The "Votive" exhibit is displayed in the Entry Hall of Hallgrimskirkja.
The “Votive” exhibit is displayed in the Entry Hall of Hallgrimskirkja.
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The exhibition, “Votive”, is in recognition of the “offerings” used in the churches of most cultures. Men have always felt the need to ask or give thanks for something important in life. In Christianity, the votive custom peaked during the Baroque era
Art display inside the Hallgrimskirkja by artist Inga S. Ragnarsottir.
Art display inside the Hallgrimskirkja by artist Inga S. Ragnarsottir.
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The artist uses stucco marble (a mixture of plaster, animal glue and pigments.) First used as a substitute for real marble, it emerged as a medium of aesthetic value, allowing for color combinations not found in nature.
The Reykjavik Domestic Airport, right in the middle of the city!
The Reykjavik Domestic Airport, right in the middle of the city!  The Keflavik International Airport is outside of town.
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Tjornin Lake, often refered to as “The Pond” , seen from atop the tower of Hallgrimskirkja.
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From the Tower of Hallgrimskirkja, looking Northwest. That is the Leif Erickson monument directly below. Have you noiced the wonderfully colorful roofs!
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The Settlement Exhibit very kindly allows patrons over the age of 65 to enter for free. Inside, an excavated home from the 9th century is on display. Modern technology and an interactive format makes this a very interesting museum.
The oldest house in Reykjavik
The oldest house in Reykjavik
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The house is two rooms wide and only one room deep with a center hall and second story. A modern addition behind this house tells the story of the year 1918. Momentous because of the severe, icy winter; the Spanish flu; and Icelandic independence.
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Visitors are not allowed to visit the 2nd floor but there is a gift shop at the entry.
The old water fountain is across the street from the oldest house in Reykjavik.
The old water fountain is across the street from the oldest house in Reykjavik.
Now this is funny!
Now this is funny!
But how effective could it be?  No one is giving it a try!  We didn't either!
But how effective could it be? No one is giving it a try! We didn’t either!
We decided to try Egill Jacobsen's.
We decided to try Egill Jacobsen’s.
We had Chicken Nachoes, a beer and a wine.
We had Chicken Nachos, a beer and a wine.
This was a $50.00 snack!  And ended our day in Reykjavik.
This was a $50.00 snack! And ended our day in Reykjavik.

 

We now have a couple of sea days as we make our way to Alesund, Norway.