Patmos, Greece An Article in Milieu Magazine

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Recently, I picked up the Fall 2018 issue of Milieu Magazine.  This is the 5-year anniversary issue and is simply chock-full of interesting articles!  One, in particular, captured my attention.  It was in the travel section.  Written by Charlotte Di Careaci with photography by Miguel Flores-Vianna, it transported me to the fall of 2015 and our very first visit to the amazing Greek island of Patmos!

Milieu Magazine, Fall 2018, 5th anniversary issue.
Milieu Magazine, Fall 2018, 5th anniversary issue.

Located in the Aegean Sea, Patmos is famous because John of Patmos, who wrote the Bible’s Book of Revelation, did so, here, sometime around 70AD.  The cave where John received the Revelation is located between the capital city of Chora and the port city of Skala.  The Cave of the Apocalypse is open to the public and has made Patmos a destination of pilgrimage.  In 1999, Chora, the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian, and the Cave of the Apocalypse were all named UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

The port city of Skala as seen from the Aegean Sea.
The port city of Skala as seen from the Aegean Sea.
The road from Skala to Chora.  The Cave of the Apocalypse is along this route.
The road from Skala to Chora. The Cave of the Apocalypse is along this route.
The Monastery of Patmos built c. 100AD uphill from the Cave of the Apocalypse.
The Monastery of Patmos built c. 100AD uphill from the Cave of the Apocalypse.

Today, Patmos is a destination paradise for travelers seeking solitude, beautiful beaches, awesome mountain cliffs, amazing monasteries & convents & churches.  Oh yes, the architecture is enchanting!  We have visited the port city of Skala.  Our short visit consisted of strolling the narrow streets, sipping coffee in welcoming outdoor cafes, shopping charming independent boutiques, savoring the seafood, and gazing, in admiration, upon the sites!

Walking the streets of Skala.
Walking the streets of Skala.
Windmills on a hillside above the town.
Windmills on a hillside above the town.
Seafood is the specialty!
Seafood is the specialty!
Wonderful cafes are everywher!
Wonderful cafes are everywhere!
Boutique shopping in Skala.
Boutique shopping in Skala.
One of the more than 300 churches on the island!
One of the more than 300 churches on the island!
The charming port city of Skala.
The charming port city of Skala.

Reading this Milieu article took me back to that most pleasant port -of-call.  We look forward to returning, someday!  Meanwhile, I thank talented people like Ms. Careaci and Mr. Flores-Vianna for awakening the memories that bring the sights, smells, and emotions of travel back to the forefront!

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Thursday, August 23, 2018

 

At 8:00am this morning, we smoothly glided into port and docked at Pier 21.  This is where all the waterfront attractions start.  The Garrison Brewery, Farmers Market and the Pier 21 Museum are next to the ship’s dock.  The Garrison Brewery (across the street from pier 20) is not the historic brewery in town, but they did start Nova Scotia’s “craft beer” movement with their “Irish Red Ale” in 1997.  The Farmers Market located in the building south of pier 20 is open from 10:00am to 5:00pm.  The Immigration Museum is located between piers 20 and 22 on 1055 Marginal Rd.  They’re open from 9:30am to 5:30pm and admission is 7.60CAD/pp/senior.

The Alexander Keith Brewery at 1496 Lower Water Street is the historic brewery of Halifax.  Begun in 1820, it remains in operation and produces India Pale Ale, the most popular beer in Nova Scotia.  One-hour tours ($23.95CAD/pp/sr) are available from 12:00pm to 7:00pm, running every ½ hour.  A beer tasting culminates the tour.  Keith Hall, the historic residence, is behind the brewery on Hollis St. and connected by an underground tunnel.  It’s been restored for commercial use.  Further up Lower Water Street at #1675, is the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic with its extensive displays from the Days of the Sail to Age of Steam; artifacts from the Titanic; and exhibits of the devastating Halifax Explosion.  (open 9:30am-5:30pm; admission 8.50CAD/pp/sr.)

All of this is within easy walking distance of the ship.  We know because we have done all this in the past.  But today, we are booked on the ship’s tour, “Iconic Towns of Nova Scotia” and will visit Peggy’s Cove, Lunenburg, and Mahone Bay.

Here are the photos:

Sailing into Halifax past George's Island.
Sailing into Halifax past George’s Island.
Docking at pier 21.
Docking at pier 21.
Museum of Immigration is right there!
Museum of Immigration is right there!
So is the Farmers' Market.
So is the Farmers’ Market.
Departing pier 21 on the "Iconic towns of Nova Scotia" tour.
Departing pier 21 on the “Iconic towns of Nova Scotia” tour.
Leaving Halifax, we pass the Old Burial Grounds in use from 1749 to 1843.
Leaving Halifax, we pass the Old Burial Grounds in use from 1749 to 1843.
On our way to Peggy's Cove we pass thru some lovely countryside.
On our way to Peggy’s Cove we pass thru some lovely countryside.
Arriving in Peggy's Cove.
Arriving in Peggy’s Cove.
The de Garthe Gallery
The de Garthe Gallery
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This sculpture by William de Garthe is a 100-foot long granite outcropping situated behind his home in Peggy’s Cove. It is his “lasting monument to Nova Scotia fishermen” and depicts 32 fishermen, their wives and children.
Beautiful Peggy's Cove
Beautiful Peggy’s Cove
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Everywhere you look there is something lovely to photograph!
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The iconic Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse is the most photographed lighthouse in Canada!
Leaving Peggy's Cove and headed to Lunenburg.
Leaving Peggy’s Cove and headed to Lunenburg.
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Unfortunately, the bus broke down! Another bus came to offer assistance. Couldn’t help. Left us.
The police came to re-direct traffic.  That was needed!!!!
The police came to re-direct traffic. That was needed!!!!
So we exited the bus and waited for another to come pick us up!
So we exited the bus and waited for another to come pick us up!
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These folks weren’t home so they never knew we had hung out in their front yard for a while.
We finally arrive in Lunenburg.
We finally arrive in Lunenburg.
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This is a charming and historic town that commemorates Nova Scotia’s sailing and fishing tradition. Lunenburg is a UNESCO World Heritage Site
The famous Bluenose II going out for a sail.
The famous Bluenose II going out for a sail.
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The carriage ride is a pleasant way to see the town. This is the rest stop for the horses.
Leaving Lunenburg and heading to Mahone Bay we pass many beautiful homes.
Leaving Lunenburg and heading to Mahone Bay we pass many beautiful homes.
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An example of the Lunenburg bump in architecture. The 3-window projecction over the door is distinctive.
Arriving in Mahone Bay
Arriving in Mahone Bay
The old railroad station is now a smallshopping complex.
The old railroad station is now a small shopping complex.
Mahone Bay looks like a charming community.
Mahone Bay looks like a charming community.
Obviously, sailing is a way of life here.
Obviously, sailing is a way of life here.
As we leave Mahone Bay, anoher excellent example of the Lunenburg bump.
As we leave Mahone Bay, anoher excellent example of the Lunenburg bump.
Heading back to the ship in Halifax.
Heading back to the ship in Halifax.
Back to Pier 21.
Back to Pier 21.
Unfortunately it's after 5:00pm and the Farmers' Market is closed.
Unfortunately it’s after 5:00pm and the Farmers’ Market is closed.
Nothing to see or buy.
Nothing to see or buy.
Nothing to eat.
Nothing to eat.
No one around.
No one around.
Time to head for the ship.
Time to head for the ship.

Our voyage comes to an end.  We are now on our way back to Boston and look forward, as always, to going home!  Thank you for joining us on this adventure.  We’ll look forward to sharing our next journey with you!!!!

St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

 

St. Johns, the capital of Newfoundland and Labrador and the province’s largest city, is not only the furthest-east city in North America, it is also the oldest.  First discovered in 1497 by John Cabot, it was later claimed as the first permanent settlement in North America for the British Empire by Sir Humphrey Gilbert.  As you might imagine, St. Johns has had a long and significant history:  the Vikings are sure to have been in this area in the 1000s; and 900 years later, in 1901, Marconi received the first radio signals from across the ocean at Signal Hill; in 1919 Alcock & Crown departed from St. John’s on the first successful transatlantic flight by a team of aviators; and in 1927 Charles Lindberg’s last North American landmark sighting on his famous solo flight across the Atlantic was of Cabot Tower on Signal Hill.

St. John’s is noted for its pubs, food, and music scene.  An entire book, The Overcast’s Guide to Beers of Newfoundland, (The Definitive Guide to Beer on the Rock), Breakwater Books, 2018, has been written about the breweries and beers of this island.

We began our day late—not leaving the ship until after lunch—and walked around sampling the shopping, food and drink along the way.  Water Street is the main shopping street.  The shops are quite charming, usually several rooms of merchandise, and no two shops seem to have the same wares (quite an unusual and refreshing experience.)  George Street is the main street for pubs.  The rest of the city hugs the harbor and runs uphill for several blocks.  It is very compact but requires long staircases to get from one street to another!

The pictures will tell the story:

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The sail-in to St. John’s Harbor is quite lovely. It’s a shame the ship’s windows are so dirty–but I hope you get a sense of this rugged terrain.
This is quite a busy harbor.
This is quite a busy harbor.
It's a working port.
It’s a working port.
That ship docked in front of us is a supply ship for the oil patforms.
That ship docked in front of us is a supply ship for the oil patforms.
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This is Harbourside Park. Those statues are of a Labrador Retriever and a Newfoundland. The breeds are native to this province.
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Nobody knows the origins of the Newfoundland. He may be descended from the Tibetan Mastiff or the Norse Black Bear Dog or others. But it is known that he arrived with the fishermen. The breed is known for strength, endurance and intelligence.
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The Labrador Retriever is descended from the Newfoundland. Mated with English Setters and Pointers for gaming, they are also a gentle, loyal, family dog comfortable in the water, on small boats and in the home.
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Everywhere we went in Newfoundland, someone would bring their Newfoundland dog by for a pet and a visit. This puppy is just to precious for words!
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This photo, taken from the ship, shows the layering of the city. The Courthouse (forefront) is on Water Street. Above it is the Anglican Cathedral of St. John the Baptist; above that the Basillica of St. John and to the left, The Rooms Museum.
St John's Court House
St John’s Court House
Anglican Cathedral of St John the Baptist
Anglican Cathedral of St John the Baptist
Basillica of St John the Baptist
Basillica of St John the Baptist
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The Rooms is a cultural space where archives, artifacts and art come together to show the nature of this province. It is an experience.
Gower Street United Church
Gower Street United Church
Taking the stairway up to George Street.
Taking the stairway up to George Street.
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Coming down the courthouse staircase from Duckworth Street to George Street. That’s Clift’s Baird’s Cove Street going down to the water.
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We sailed into St. John’s Harbour through “The Narrows”, that you see directly ahead. You are looking at Signal Hill on the Left. and Cahill Point with Fort Amherst on the right.
This is Cabot Tower, atop Signal Hill.
This is Cabot Tower, atop Signal Hill.
A shop entrance on George Street.
A shop entrance on George Street.
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The book of Newfoundland beers! A wealth of information, history, and statistics. The industry began in the early 1800s but in 1962, the independents were bought up by the large national breweries. Only the brews from 3 St. John’s breweries survived .
We sampled our first local beer at The Newfoudland Pub & Eatery.
We sampled our first local beer at The Newfoudland Pub & Eatery.
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Black Horse, originally brewed by Bennet Brewing is now owned by Molson. It is still (and only) brewed in St. John’s. We enjoyed our drinks with a spicy plate of nachos! And the Pinot Grigio was good, also!
Later, we stopped at Erin's Pub on George Street.
Later, we stopped at Erin’s Pub on George Street.
Live entertainment is provided by by Kevin Joyce.
Live entertainment is provided by by Kevin Joyce.
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The bar at Erin’s Pub on George Street stocked not only the the 6 surviving traditional brands of St. John’s along with an international asortment, but also the new kid on the block: Iceberg beer, brewed by the microbrewery, Quidi Vidi Brewing.
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Quidi Vidi opened in 1996. Its most distinctive offering is Iceberg beer. This is made with the purest, softest water in the world–iceberg water! Harvesters go out and, by means of mechanical jaws, bore holes into the icebergs to grab center chunks.
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After a truly enjoyable and enlightening afternoon libation, we walked back to MS Rotterdam and awaited the the beautiful sail-away while having dinner. Very nice port.

 

 

Our next port is our last port.  We will visit Halifax Nova Scotia.

St. Anthony, Newfoundland, Canada

2018 HAL Voyage of he Vikings

Monday, August 20, 2018

 

Perhaps you remember the story of Bjarni Herjolfsson.  “Around 985, he was blown off course from Greenland, and made a chance sighting of land to the west.  Some 15 years later, Leif Eriksson set out from the Eastern Settlement in Greenland to investigate Bjarni’s sighting.  Sailing to the northwest, he first came upon a land of bare rock and glaciers which he called Helluland (Slab Land).  Sailing south he next reached a low, forested land.  This he called Markland (Wood Land), Leif pressed on still further south and spent a winter in a land with a mild climate, where grapes grew wild and rivers teemed with salmon.  Leif called this Vinland (Wine Land).

The locations of his discoveries will probably never be established with absolute certainty.  Helluland was probably Baffin Island; Markland was almost certainly Labrador.  Identifying Vinland is more difficult.  The only Norse settlement so far discovered in North America is at L’Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland, but this is too far north to fit the saga descriptions.  Vinlalnd probably lay south of the Gulf of St Lawrence, the approximate northern limit of the wild grapes, but north of Cape Cod, the southern limit of the Atlantic Salmon.”  (Cited from The Penguin Historical Atlas of the Vikings, 1995, John Haywood, author.)  It is more likely that L’Anse aux Meadow was a staging settlement for transport and repair.  But nobody knows for sure!

We anchored in St. Anthony harbor around 7:00am.  By 8:30am, we had tendered to shore and were on the van operated by Danny’s Airbus ready to visit L’Anse aux Meadows and Norsted, the re-created village with re-enactors to tell the stories (5-hour tour, 95.00 CAD/pp).  After a 30-minute drive, we were there!   L’Anse aux Meadows is both a National Historic Site and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  So designated because it’s one of the major archaeological finds in the world.  The significance lies in what has been learned about the worldwide movements of people.  The Norsemen were the first Europeans to come in contact with the Aboriginal Peoples of North America, thus completing the Circle of Human Migration.

We’ll let the photos tell the story:

Sailing into St. Anthony Harbor.
Sailing into St. Anthony Harbor.
At anchor in St Anthony.
At anchor in St Anthony.
The tenders have been lowered.
The tenders have been lowered.
They are ready to start loading up.
They are ready to start loading up.
Using A deck forward for the tenders, today.
Using A deck forward for the tenders, today.
Arriving at the Tender Dock.
Arriving at the Tender Dock.
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Anne Stine and Helge Ingstad discovered the Viking Village at L’Anse aux Meadows in 1960. They spotted the undulating terrain and immediatedly suspected that they had found Vinland! They returned the next Spring and began the archaeological dig!
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The undulating indentations of the sod house foundations are what led to the hope this might be Vinland.
The tour begins with a ranger talk at the Visitors Center.
The tour begins with a ranger talk at the Visitors Center.
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Just imagine how excited Helge and Anne Stine Ingstad must have been to see this evidence of an entire village!
It was goose-bump thrilling just to walk by!
It was goose-bump thrilling just to walk by!
This is what a sod house looked like.
This is what a sod house looked like.
Inside a sod house.
Inside a sod house.
A communal room with fire.
A communal room with fire.
Sod foundations are made of peat.
Sod foundations are made of peat.
A church
A church
church interior
church interior
The Smithy
The Smithy
Women at work
Women at work
Food for tasting
Food for tasting
Games to be played.
Games to be played.
A vegetable garden
A vegetable garden
The chicken coop
The chicken coop
The pig sty
The pig sty
Bacon!
Bacon!
The Boat House
The Boat House
The building of a boat.
The building of a boat.
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The sculpture, Meeting of the Peoples, commemorating the completion of the Circle of Human Migration.
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As we returned to the tender dock, it was necessary to stop at the Dark Tickle for souvenirs!
Today, the end of day libation was aboard the ship!
Today, the end of day libation was aboard the ship!

Next, we move on to St. John’s, Newfoundland.

Nanortalik, Greenland

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Saturday, August 18, 2018

 

“The settlement of Greenland was probably a result of population pressure in Iceland.  Greenland was discovered accidently by a storm-driven seafarer around 930, but its hostile, ice-bound appearance excited little interest until Eric the Red, a man with many enemies, rounded Cape Farewell some time around 983, looking for a safe place to spend his exile from Iceland, and discovered the ice-free eastern fjords.  By this time, all the good land in Iceland had long been settled.  Many latecomers, like Erik himself, were living on marginal land, so there was no shortage of potential settlers willing to emigrate to Greenland.”  The Penguin Historical Atlas of the Vikings, by John Haywood (Penguin Books 1995.)  And so, they came.  But the town itself did not garner prominence until 1797 when a permanent trading depot was set up.

In Greenland, there are no roads connecting the towns.  All transport is by plane or boat.  Also, a tourist will never understand the Greenlandic language. It is called Kalaallisut, which literally means, the Greenlanders language, and it is not spoken anywhere else!  Such was the case for me as I listened to a local making a purchase in the supermarket—not a word did I understand.  But, fortunately, the Greenlanders are pretty conversant with English.

This is a pretty small community, so there aren’t too many photos.  But I hope you’ll get a feel for what its like to live in this northern clime!

We are anchored in a very pretty spot.
We are anchored in a very pretty spot.
There are icebergs floating by.
There are icebergs floating by.
This one is hung up on a spit of land.
This one is hung up on a spit of land.
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Nanortalik means “place of polar bears” because the polar bears occassionally come to town. I wonder if they ever float in by means of an iceberg!
The tenders are swiftly depoyed.
The tenders are swiftly depoyed.
It's a short ride to the tender dock.
It’s a short ride to the tender dock.
The colorful buildings are attractive.
The colorful buildings are attractive.
The buildings were simply positioned in and around the rocks!
The buildings were simply positioned in and around the rocks!
The Nanortalik Kirke was built 1n 1916.
The Nanortalik Kirke was built 1n 1916.
That red building is a supermarket and general store.
That red building is a supermarket and general store.
The food and general supplies are all jumbled together!
The food and general supplies are all jumbled together!
The pastries look pretty good.
The pastries look pretty good.
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Those rifles are undoubtedly for the Polar Bears! Note the breadmaker filling his shelves on the left!
TVs and furniture are available.
TVs and furniture are available.
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The houses are cleverly built between the boulders and they are all painted cheerful colors!
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Walking to the Hotel Kap Farval, we noted that a repainting project was underway. How difficult it must be to try painting outdoors while contending with freezing temperatures!
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Inside the Hotel Kap Farval all was warm and cozy. The restaurant was closed at this time, but they graciously allowed us to have a drink! We had the whole place to ourselves!
There were 3 beer choices at this hotel--all 3 from Denmark.
There were 3 beer choices at this hotel–all 3 from Denmark.
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So, we enjoyed our port libation at the Hotel Kap Farval before heading back to the ship.
We saw this in the driveway.  Do you suppose it's the Courtesy Shuttle?
We saw this in the driveway. Do you suppose it’s the Courtesy Shuttle?
As we strolled back to the tender dock, we spotted this quaint little old boat.
As we strolled back to the tender dock, we spotted this quaint little old boat.
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We also saw an older gentleman walking his dog–just like many retirees we’ve seen! We’ve spotted folks doing this with their golf carts!!!!
And quickly, we are back to the tender dock for the return trip to the ship.
And quickly, we are back to the tender dock for the return trip to the ship.
And we will soon say a fond farewell to Nanortalik.
And we will soon say a fond farewell to Nanortalik.

 

And now, we are sailing back to North America.  Our next port is St. Anthony, Newfoundland where we will take an excursion to L’Anse aux Meadows—the only confirmed Viking settlement on the North American continent.

Isafjordur, Iceland

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

 

We sailed into Isafjordur along the fjord, Skutulsfjordur.  Isafjordur is a fully functioning fishing village.  It’s a real working town with a mall, supermarket, many cafes, a Maritime Museum, the Byggoasafn Vestfjaroa Museum and an historic district!  We spent a nice afternoon wandering through town and enjoying a surprisingly cosmopolitan attitude for such a small community!

Please enjoy the photos:

Here we are, docked in Isafjordur, Iceland.
Here we are, docked in Isafjordur, Iceland.

Fortunately it was a short walk into town---it was freezing!
Fortunately it was a short walk into town—it was freezing!
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Roger braved the cold of Isafjordur in a Gore-Tex parka. With gloves! With ski cap! Did I mention, IT IS FREEZING!
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Now, that is a bell. Why is it there? Does it still work? There was no one to ask.
Memorial plaque honoring sailors of WWII.
Memorial plaque honoring sailors of WWII.
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The House Doctor for all things decorative! I found the name to be most cleaver! And just the need for a home decor shop seemed very cosmopolitan for such a small community!
Aww, cute litlle van!  Wonder if the bakery uses it for deliveries.
Aww, cute litlle van! Wonder if the bakery uses it for deliveries.
I have been told this is the best bakery ever!
I have been told this is the best bakery ever!
Could be, it all looks pretty good!
Could be, it all looks pretty good!
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The Museum of Everyday Life. You have got to love the concept! It honors the easy chair, side table, cup of tea and a good book. We didn’t go in; but if we ever return to Akureyri I’ll make it a point to do so.
Downtown Isafjordur. That's the Neisti Mall on the left.
Downtown Isafjordur. That’s the Neisti Mall on the left.
Cute cafe across the street from the mall.  We stopped for beer and wine!
Cute cafe across the street from the mall. We stopped for beer and wine!
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This is billed as the historic district. But it looks suspiciously like a new project! Those are new pavers being laid. And the buildings look freshly painted.
These certainly are nice looking buildings.  They all seem to be metal.
These certainly are nice looking buildings. They all seem to be metal.
Maybe we'll return someday and see the final resultsof this project.
Maybe we’ll return someday and see the final resultsof this project.
Looking good.
Looking good.
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This route thru the historic area is actually a shorter walk between the town and the ship. When it’s completed, the ship’s passengers will be happy to walk it, maybe there will be shops, perhaps cafes?!?
Like the color scheme on this block!
Like the color scheme on this block!
Like the vehicle!  What is it?  A Volvo van?  It matches the house!!!!!
Like the vehicle! What is it? A Volvo van? It matches the house!!!!!
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Cute. We’ve learned that the siding of these buildings with their unusual texture is actually made of tiles of pre-pressed iron plates imported from America in the 1930s!
This is the tender dock.
This is the tender dock.
And this is Skutululsfjordur Bay where our ship is docked.
And this is Skutululsfjordur Bay where our ship is docked.
And this is our final view of Isfjordur, Iceland.
And this is our final view of Isfjordur, Iceland.

Next, we make our way to Nanortalik, Greenland.

Akureyri, Iceland

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

 

At 1:00am this morning, we crossed the Arctic Circle.  Akureyri is situated on the south end of the Eyjafjordur channel, the longest fjord in Iceland.  We docked at the Oddeyrarbryggja Pier which is located only a few blocks from the town center.  An easy walk.

The history of Akureyri dates to the 9th century.  Helgi magri (Helgi the thin), a Norse Viking, settled in the area.  But it wasn’t until the 1500s that Akureyri began to flourish.  Danish merchants would build houses in Akureyri so they could come to stay for the summer and trade their wares.

Akureyri turned into a charming town:

On the dock in Akureyri, Iceland.
On the dock in Akureyri, Iceland.
This is not called an esplanade, but it funtions as one.
This is not called an esplanade, but it funtions as one.
A little bit of history is presented on sign boards as we walk into town.
A little bit of history is presented on sign boards as we walk into town.
And we wind up in a pretty Town Square.
And we wind up in a pretty Town Square.
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Stopped at Kristjan’s Bakery for coffee and rolls. And, as you may have noticed, WIFI, too!
The sweets were very nice!  That explains the long line.
The sweets were very nice! That explains the long line.
Naturally, we shopped our way up the main street.
Naturally, we shopped our way up the main street.
Blaa Kannan Cafe serves the iconic Icelandic cake "terta."
Blaa Kannan Cafe serves the iconic Icelandic cake “terta.”
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Now, have you ever seen that! A kiosk for lasagna! On our return to the ship, this kiosk was open and doing a great business!
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Eymundsson Bookstore is a large chain in Iceland. They have a huge selection of english language books; a cafe and a big array of office supplies.
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Akureyrarkirkja was built in 1940 and has become the iconic symbol of this town.
Ah, the view makes the climb worthwhile!
Ah, the view makes the climb worthwhile!
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The Hotel Kea sits at the base of the church steps. Makes it a good place to stop for refreshment after the trek up and down those gazillion steps!
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The patio at the Hotel Kea was pleasant while the sun was out. Later, the sky clouded and a breeze kicked up. Got a little chilly!
The end of day libation at the Hotel Kea
The end of day libation at the Hotel Kea
And then we trudged back to the ship after a tiring but fun-filled day!
And then we trudged back to the ship after a tiring but fun-filled day!

 

Our next port-of-call is Isafjordur, Iceland.