Dublin, Ireland

2019 HAL World Cruise

Sunday, May 5, 2019

 

Dublin, the capital and most populated city of Ireland, is a lively port that satisfies the tastes, and expectations of most tourists.  Located at the mouth of the Liffey River, it was originally founded as a Viking settlement in the 9th century.  Today, it is among the top 30 cities of he world according to the Globalization and World Cities Research Network.  The city spreads over the broad valley of the Liffey River and sweeps around Dublin Bay.  Trinity College is the most famous landmark.  It was founded by Elizabeth I in 1591 and is noted for the Book of Kells.  The Temple Bar district on the south bank of the Liffey, has a mixture of food, drink, shopping and music all located on narrow, cobbled streets.  There are a gazillion museums, amazing parks, dazzling architecture, and great shopping.  It is impossible to see it all in one visit, but a HOHO can hit most of the top sights.

Over the years, we have been here often and much of what I’ve described can be found in the old blog posts from mid-August 2018 (look in archives).  I’ll also slip-in some old photos at the end of this post.  But, today, I’d like to tell you about Merrion Square.  Since we were here for only the day, we made this our dedicated sight to see and walked all over the area until we stopped for lunch and a libation before returning to the ship for the sail-away.  Have a look:

 

We docked at Alexandra Quay, an industrial area, and shuttled into town.
We docked at Alexandra Quay, an industrial area, and shuttled into town.
2
We followed the Liffey from the port to the drop-off point at Merrion Square. Here, we are passing the Samuel Beckett Bridge.
3
The Famine Memorial to the Great Irish Famine of 1845-1849. About a million people died and a million more emigrated from Ireland. The population decreased by nearly 25%!!! One third of the population was entirely dependent on the potato for food.
4
Merrion Square was created in 1762. The Duke of Leister,having built a palace here, wanted to attract the aristocracy to the area. Over the next 30 years, Georgian townhouses, following strict guidelines,were erected on 3 sides of the park.
The Duke's palace, Leister House is now the Parliament.
The Duke’s palace, Leister House is now the Parliament.
6
The Duke of Leister built this amazing palace in the 1700s. When he created the park, it was set up as a private retreat accessed by residents of the square only. This sounds very much like Gramercy Park in New York City!
7
This is the Eternal Flame Memorial/Defense Forces Memorial 2008 designed by Brian King. It is a recent addition to the park. Local artists come to display and sell their artwork on the fence.
8
This Statue of Oscar Wilde is in Merrion Park because the author and dramatist was raised in the townhouse at #1 Merrion Square.
9
Number 1 Merrion Square, the childhood home of writer and dramatist Oscar Wilde, is now owned by the American College Dublin.
Daniel O'Connell, the Liberator, lived at #58.
Daniel O’Connell, the Liberator, lived at #58.
Number  82 was the home of poet & playwrite William Butler Yeats.
Number 82 was the home of poet & playwright William Butler Yeats.
Number 30 was the home of Bram Stoker, author of Dracula.
Number 30 was the home of Bram Stoker, author of Dracula.
And # 56 is currently the home of designer, Louise Kennedy.
And # 56 is currently the home of designer, Louise Kennedy.
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This is the Merrion Hotel where the doorman kindly directed us to the Doheny & Nesbitt Pub for lunch. Good advice!!!
Doheny & Nesbitt at 4-5 Lower Baggot St. was established in 1867.
Doheny & Nesbitt, at 4-5 Lower Baggot St., was established in 1867.
They have a pretty good selection of Irish Whiskey!!!
They have a pretty good selection of Irish Whiskey!!!
And a nice selection of beer on tap.
And a nice selection of beer on tap.
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This is a snug. Originally incorporated in pubs for ladies, and perhaps others, who did not wish to be seen in a drinking establishment.
Inside the snug you can see the window to the bar for ordering replenishments.
Inside the snug you can see the window to the bar for ordering replenishments.
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Rog is enjoying a Smithwick’s for his afternoon libation. Note the modernized bar behind him. Admirably, they paid strict attention to retaining the original fixtures, decor and atmosphere.
Smithwick's is an Irish Ale.
Smithwick’s is an Irish Ale.
Lunch was Bangers & Mash with peas.
Lunch was Bangers & Mash with peas.
Sandy had mussels in a white wine sauce.
Sandy had mussels in a white wine sauce.
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Some of the original bar area is partitioned (like a snug) for only a few patrons to occupy. The gentleman occupying this one, graciously took our picture.

And here are some of our old photos of Dublin:

Ha'penny Bridge over the Liffey and leading to the Temple Bar area.
Ha’penny Bridge over the Liffey and leading to the Temple Bar area.
Merchant's Arch:  pathway from River Liffey to Temple Bar
Merchant’s Arch: pathway from River Liffey to Temple Bar
The Temple Bar in Temple Bar
The Temple Bar in Temple Bar
Mansion House:  the Mayor's Residence.
Mansion House: the Mayor’s Residence.
Christ Church
Christ Church
Kilmainham Jail
Kilmainham Jail

 

Next, we’re off to Cobh (Cork), Ireland.

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