Dublin, Ireland Day 2

Liffey 2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Thursday, August 9, 2018

 

On day 2 in Dublin, we simply went out to enjoy the sights, shopping and food.  As we drove past a beach in Dublin, we talked about the start of this city as a Viking “longphort” (a fortification for the protection of the boats.)  Was it on a beach such as this that the first buildings were erected?  Well, no.  The Viking fortification was near Dublin Castle along the Liffey River.   So, with curiosity piqued, we wondered what a Viking marine fortification would look like.  Back we went to the photos we had taken in Alesund, Norway at the Sunnmore Museum as well as those we had just taken at Guinness Lake in Glendalough a few miles outside of Dublin.  After reviewing turf houses and boat-building sheds we concluded the stage sets for the TV series, Vikings, seemed to be right on.  The longboats would easily sail up the Liffey.  And the turf houses would be easy to erect.

Our curiosity satisfied, we turned our attention to modern-day Dublin.  It is a beautiful and vibrant city with lots to see and do; all within easy walking distance.

Let me show you some photos!

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There are beaches in Dublin. Who knew! This one is not where the Vikings had their “longphort” but it is nearby. The longphort was near where Dublin Castle now stands.
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We wondered if turf structures like these at Sunnmore Museum in Alesund, Norway might have been erected at the longphort.
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However, structures like this Viking hut, constructed as a stage set for the TV series, Vikings, could easily have been part of the defensive structures.
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Coud this TV stage set be a reasonable depiction of how the modern city of Dublin began? I’ll have to do some more research!
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But this is how Dublin looks today. This is the O’Connell Bridge and it is centrally located on the Liffey. That’s the Ha’penny Bridge ahead; Temple Bar is off to the left.
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This photo is looking North along O’Connell Street. The median is lined with statues. The first one you see here is of Daniel O’Connell, a political leader of the first half of the 19th century.
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The Spire of Dublin, also on O’Conell St., is sometimes called The Monument of Light Spire.
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The Liffey River looking West towards the Ha’penny Bridge spanning the next crossing.
The Liffey River looking East towards the Customs House.
The Liffey River looking East towards the Customs House.
Looking to the South.
Looking to the South.
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Eason Books is a large Irish bookstore chain. Founded in 1886, Eason & Son now have more than 60 stores throughout Ireland. This is the flagship store on O’Connell St.
I'd forgotten this is a city where college students conduct free tours.
I’d forgotten this is a city where college students conduct free tours.
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The Guinness Brewery is quite a large complex in Southwest Dublin along the Liffey River.
Guinness Factory & Museum
Guinness Factory & Museum
Statue of Sir Benjamin Lee Guinness on the grounds of St. Patrick's.
Statue of Sir Benjamin Lee Guinness on the grounds of St. Patrick’s.
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St. Patrick’s Cathedral has a spectacular choir loft and contains Ireland’s largest and most powerful organ. The stalls are decorated with the insignia of the Knights of St. Patrick.
Marsh's Library at St. Patrick's Cathedral
Marsh’s Library at St. Patrick’s Cathedral
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Christ Church Cathedral was built from 1172 to 1220. It stands on high ground above the Liffey.
Christ Church Cathedral
Christ Church Cathedral
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This is Trinity College. That line you see is waiting to view The Book of Kells in the Old Library.
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Parliament Square Inside Trinity College Gate and the queue for Book of Kells continues!
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The Ha’penny Bridge spanning the Liffey and leading to Merchant’s Arch and the Temple Bar area.
The Merchant's Arch, a gateway to Temple Bar.
The Merchant’s Arch, a gateway to Temple Bar.
THE Temple Bar
THE Temple Bar
Temple Bar signage--so true!
Temple Bar signage–so true!
The Shack Restaurant is next door to the Temple Bar.
The Shack Restaurant is next door to the Temple Bar.
And this is where we enjoyed our end-of-day libation.
And this is where we enjoyed our end-of-day libation.

 

After this, we are on our way to Greenock, Scotland.

One thought on “Dublin, Ireland Day 2”

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