Bar Harbor, Maine

2018 HAL Voyage of the Vikings

Thursday, July 19, 2018

Bar Harbor is located on Mount Desert Island in Frenchman Bay.  This is the “Down East” area of Maine.  It is also home to Acadia National Park including Cadillac Mountain, the highest point within 25 miles of the coastline of the Eastern United States.

This is an easily walkable city.  The cruise ships anchor in Frenchman Bay and tender passengers to the Town Pier.  From the pier, it’s only a short walk to Main Street and shopping; or the Shore Path with beautiful views of the bay, Porcupine Island and the fabulous “cottages” of the wealthy; or to the museums, tour companies and, most importantly, restaurants.

The history of Bar Harbor is rich and varied.  The Native Americans lived here long before it was discovered by the French mapmaker, Samuel de Champlain in 1604. By the mid-1800s, the artists of the Hudson River School were painting landscapes of the area and selling them to wealthy and influential men and women in Boston, New York and Philadelphia.  The popularity of these paintings that depicted the mountains and the sea lured many to come and stay for the summer.  Eventually, the wealthy built “cottages” (most designed by architect William Ralph Emerson) in the classic shingle style.  Because these folks were rich and powerful, they contributed much to the area.  George B. Dorr was a tireless spokesman for conservation and devoted 43 years of his life, energy and family fortune to preserving the Acadian landscape.  With others, Dorr established the Hancock County Trustees of Public Reservations in 1901.  The sole purpose was to preserve land for the perpetual use of the public.  By 1913, Dorr was able to offer 6,000 acres of land to the federal government.  And in 1919, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act establishing Lafayette National Park (the first national park east of the Mississippi.)  The name changed to Acadia National Park in 1929.  John D. Rockefeller built and donated the roads.  Today, the park encompasses 47,000 acres and includes sea, forests, lakes, and mountains.  It is beautiful!

We had a lovely day in Bar Harbor.  We began with a short walk through town, had lunch at Paddy’s Irish Pub, and took a 2 ½ hour tour to Acadia National Park on Oli’s Trolley.  (We ordered the tickets on-line for 42.40/pp.)

We have lots of photos to show you!

Anchored in Frenchman Bay in Bar Hatbor, Maine
Anchored in Frenchman Bay in Bar Hatbor, Maine
Tenders are ready to take us ashore.
Tenders are ready to take us ashore.
Loading and transport to the tender pier takes about 15 to 20 minutes.
Loading and transport to the tender pier takes about 15 to 20 minutes.
The tender pier in Bar Harbor.
The tender pier in Bar Harbor.
Some of the "cottages" in Bar Harbor.
Some of the “cottages” in Bar Harbor.
They are all lovely homes.
They are all lovely homes.
Porcupine Islnd and Dry Ledge
Porcupine Island and Dry Ledge
Looking up Main Street in Bar Harbor.
Looking up Main Street in Bar Harbor.
9 (640x346)
The Bar Harbor Club is a private club established by J.P. Morgan in 1930. He would host elaborate parties here for all his friends enjoying the summer season in Bar Harbor. Fred Astair’s movie, Puttin’ on the Ritz, was filmed here.
Lining up for Ollie's Trolley.
Lining up for Oli’s Trolley.
Jordan Pond and "The Bubbles" across the way.
Jordan Pond and “The Bubbles” across the way.
Eagle Lake in Acadia national Park
Eagle Lake in Acadia national Park
View of the MS Rotterdam and Bar Harbor from atop Cadillac Mountain.
View of the MS Rotterdam and Bar Harbor from atop Cadillac Mountain.
Bar Harbor North from Cadillac Mountain.
Bar Harbor North from Cadillac Mountain.
15 (640x331)
John D. Rockefeller built and donated the roads in Acadia National Park. He used granite guard rails to blend the roadway with nature.
Thunder Hole in Acadia National Park
Thunder Hole in Acadia National Park
We are in Puffin country!
We are in Puffin country!
18 (640x355)
Paddy’s Irish Pub, right across from the Tender Pier! Thinking of you, “The Daves!”
Enjoying the local brew!
Enjoying the local brew!
Returning to the Bar Harbor Town Pier to catch the tender back to the ship.
Returning to the Bar Harbor Town Pier to catch the tender back to the ship.
21 (640x351)
Our final view is of the Bar Harbor Inn along the Shore Path Rd. There were many inns and homes like this all over Bar Harbor until the great fire of 1947 destroyed most of the area.

 

Now on our way to Sydney, Nova Scotia.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s